Tag Archives: SCK-CEN

6th Space Dinner – Looking back


On Friday 9 March the 6th Space Dinner took place at the Planetarium of the Royal Observatory of Belgium. This year’s theme was Space debris: curse or opportunity? The 6th edition of our annual flagship event was a record edition, with over 270 registrations and about 210 actual participants. Check out the infographic above!

The participants were treated to three presentations from experts of the European Space Agency, the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics and KU Leuven. Tiago Soares from the European Space Agency kicked off with a talk about the different efforts of the ESA Clean Space initiative. Thierry Magin from the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics was next. He talked about his research on aerothermodynamics and the link with space debris mitigation. Philip De Man from KU Leuven was the last speaker, with a presentation on the legal aspects of space debris.

The presentations were followed by the award ceremony of the beSPACE Awards 2018. The beSPACE Award for Personality of the Year 2018 went to Sarah Baatout for her passion for both science and space and her continuous drive to share this passion with everyone around her. First and foremost, she successfully investigates the effects of ionising radiation on molecular processes and their links with (human) health as the director of the Radiobiology Unit at SCK•CEN (Belgian Nuclear Research Centre). She is also dedicated to teaching in many different forms, acting as Guest-Professor at Ghent University and maître de conférence at the University of Namur and organising several events focused on science communication towards both the general public and the younger generations. Her outstanding enthusiasm, constant commitment and profound professionalism are key factors for the continuous success of these different endeavours. In short, Sarah’s passionate work has already inspired many scientists, students and children and will continue to do so for many years to come.

The beSPACE Award for Team of the Year 2018 went to the TRAPPIST team of ULiège for performing bold and innovative research that brings space science closer to the people. The discovery of seven Earth-sized exoplanets, out of which three could have the right conditions for life, has been awe-inspiring on many different levels. Not only did the team successfully tackle many scientific and engineering challenges along the way, it also coordinated an international network of partners and steered them toward the accomplishment of a common goal. The team’s efforts led to one of the most remarkable exoplanet discoveries in recent memory, exciting researchers and the general public alike and starting an avalanche of scientific and popular articles, documentaries, paintings, comics, and so on. On top of that, the work of the team has also significantly contributed to the reputation of Belgium in the global space sector.

The evening was concluded with the Planetarium show “Explore” and a walking dinner, giving the guests the opportunity to discuss the presentations and the awards, as well as network in a relaxed atmosphere.

P.S. A green umbrella appears to have lost its owner during the 6th Space Dinner. Contact us if you think it is yours!


Presentations:


Sponsored by:

SABCA – Antwerp SpaceSpace Applications ServicesPlanetarium of the Royal Observatory of Belgium


Pictures

beSPACE Session on Radiation – 04.12.2017 – ULB Campus Solbosch

Update after conclusion of the event

The session on radiation was deemed a success by the attendees as it provided them a great opportunity to have an in depth discussion with the speakers about their specific topics. Both presenters were kind enough to share their presentations with the beSPACE community. You will find them here with pictures taken during the session. For future events make sure to subscribe to our newsletter or follow us on facebook and twitter!

Radiation and human space exploration – Sarah Baatout

Space ionizing radiation effects – Michel Melotte

  

   

Original invitation

It’s time for another beSPACE Session! The goal of the Sessions is to dig deeper into a technical topic with a limited number of speakers and a smaller audience.

For this Session we will focus on radiation, one of the most fascinating and difficult aspects of space. The following two speakers will guide us through this topic.


Sarah Baatout
Head of the Radiobiology Unit – Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN
Prof. Dr. Sarah Baatout is the director of the Radiobiology Unit at SCK•CEN (Belgian Nuclear Research Centre). She is also Guest-Professor at Ghent University and maître de conférence at the University of Namur, teaching and directing research in the field of radiation biology, radiation protection, space biology and medicine. Sarah Baatout is a representative of Belgium at UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation) and is a member of the High Council for Health (Minister of Health). She is an alumni of the Royal Academy for Sciences and Arts of Belgium following the obtention of the prestigious Wetrems prize for the best discovery in the field of natural sciences. In 1991, she obtained a Master in Biology from UCLouvain followed by a PhD in Biochemistry at the UCLouvain in the field of oncology working on aggressive blood cancers. Presently, Sarah Baatout is also secretary/treasurer of the European Radiation Research Society. Since 2012, she is also member of the “Space” working group of the senate. She is also a member of various expert and audit groups as well as advising committees for the European Commission and the European Space Agency. She is/has been the promoters of 3 Postdocs and of 12 PhD students. She is the (co-) author of some 140 international papers.

Presentation: How does space radiation pose a threat to human space exploration?

Michel Mélotte
Radiation Expert – Thales Alenia Space in Belgium
Michel Mélotte received the qualification of Electrical Engineer from the Université de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, in 1981. He started his professional activities as designer of linear integrated circuits and finally became group leader. He has assumed various positions, inside Thales Alenia Space in Belgium in hybrid design, industrialisation and technology management. In 1993, Michel Mélotte has started his work on the effects of ionising radiation on electronics. Today it is an important part of his responsibilities in the space business. Michel is a member of the IEEE Nuclear science society, a member of the CA RADECS association and a member of the CTB radiation at ESA. He has organised, as general chairman, the conference RADECS 2000 and co-chair of the RADECS 2009. His current position in Thales Alenia Space is, as a member of the Research & Innovation team, the coordination of space radiation effects as senior expert.

Presentation: Space Ionizing Radiation Effects on Electronics


Important: admission is free but registration is mandatory. The number of seats is limited.

Date: Monday 04.12.2017

Programme:

  • 18:45 – Doors open
  • 19:00 – Presentation by Sarah Baatout
  • 20:00 – Presentation by Michel Mélotte
  • 21:00 – Snacks & drinks

Snacks & drinks: free of charge, but limited to simple refreshments. We advise you to have dinner beforehand

Location:  Université libre de Bruxelles, Campus du Solbosch, Avenue Franklin D. Roosevelt 50, 1050 Brussels – Building C, room C2.223 (https://www.ulb.ac.be/campus/solbosch/plan-en-C-en.html)

Access: